Sustainable Tompkins is a citizen-based organization working towards the long-term well-being of our communities by integrating social equity, economic vitality, ecological stewardship, and shared responsibility.

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Help ST Finish What We Started on Dryden Pipeline

Everyday you are probably getting 2 or 3 calls to action to help stop some new outrage. It’s important to help wherever you can, but it’s also important that our movement follow through on earlier efforts to make positive change and head toward greater stewardship and justice in our communities. We’re asking our supporters to take a minute today and help us complete a critical step in our community’s shared commitment to protect the climate and stop new fossil fuel infrastructure from being built in our county.

Three years ago, in the early summer of 2014, we began to hear about a proposed new gas pipeline to run through West Dryden to provide heating fuel for new development in Lansing. The large capacity of the pipe would mean that Tompkins County would be unable to meet its goal of 80% reduction in CO2 emissions by 2050.

ST helped organize local opposition to the project and teamed up to present several workshops on viable alternatives to the pipeline to meet Lansing’s energy needs. A countywide task force on energy and economic development eventually came to the same conclusions and recommended to the Public Service Commission (PSC) that NYSEG address reliability concerns for existing Lansing gas customers by adding pressure boosters to the current pipeline. In addition, NYSEG would provide incentives to developers to build new structures in Lansing using smart design and ultra-efficient heat pumps to meet commercial and residential heating loads. (Many industrial processes can be powered with electricity rather than gas as well.) Read more…

 
Let the PSC hear from You on the Dryden Pipeline!

You can use this text provided by Fossil Free Tompkins to send an email to the NYS Public Service Commission to reject further investments in fossil fuel infrastructure in Tompkins County.  Just copy and paste:

To:  secretary@dps.ny.gov

Subject:  Case 17-G-0432, NYSEG Compressor Pilot Project

Dear Commissioner Rhodes,

I am a NYSEG customer in Tompkins County. I support NYSEG’s proposal to install 4 pressure boosters to ensure adequate gas pressure in Lansing rather than building a new pipeline. Further, I strongly support our County Legislature’s pledge to reduce GHG emissions and fossil fuel use – goals that cannot be reached if we continue to expand natural gas use. We need to curtail our reliance on fossil fuels, not invest in new infrastructure that will become stranded assets. Instead we should meet our heating needs by investing in energy efficiency and heat pumps for space and water heating. NYSEG’s solution is cheaper for ratepayers, better for the environment, and supports the State’s Energy Plan for GHG reduction.

Name: _________________________

Address: ________________________

 
Mini-Grant Supports Textile Education at Luna Fiber Studio

The Trumansburg Elementary Afterschool Program visits the studio

Knowledge of textile creation is often overlooked as part of a self-sufficient, resilient community. Sarah Gotowka, weaver and owner of the Earth Grown Shades natural dye business, has taught weaving and dyeing workshops at widespread venues, but recently sought to create a permanent learning space. After founding Luna Fiber Studio in Trumansburg, she needed to supply it with looms which could not have been used in traveling workshops. In September 2016, Sarah received a Neighborhood Mini-Grant from Sustainable Tompkins to purchase essential equipment for use with four donated looms.

Since opening in October 2016, Luna Fiber Studio has hosted classes on weaving scarves, shawls, tapestries, and rag rugs, introductory weaving, and the creation and use of dyes from cochineal and locally-grown plants. Master dyer, weaver and spinner José Buenaventura González Gutiérrez, from Oaxaca, Mexico, taught the tapestry and cochineal workshops. Other events included periodic drop-in weekends open to all, private lessons, group visits, and a Painting Adoption Weekend forging a community of youth adoptees art making and dance. Students attest to the value of the experience:

Read more…

 
Signs of Sustainability
Treasure Hunt, Reuse Trail Open!

Tompkins Weekly            10-9-17

By Susanna Plotkin

Throughout October, Get Your GreenBack Tompkins is hosting the first annual Reuse Trail Treasure Hunt. The Reuse Trail is made up of 45 stores in the county that sell used goods, and 14 of them are part of the Treasure Hunt. Game participants can pick up a game card at any Treasure Hunt store and play one of two games for a chance to win between $40 and $200 in gift cards. Participation is free and no purchase is necessary; however, participants can take 10 percent off their purchase when they find a “treasure” they’d like to keep.

We have found over the years that local residents know about some secondhand stores in the community, but everyone is surprised at how many there are, and the variety of things they sell. Instead of telling people about these treasures, we made it a game, which I think is going to be really fun.

Read more…

Help Lansing Grow Using Best Green Building Practices

Tompkins Weekly    9-25-17

By Gay Nicholson

Every day you are probably getting two or three calls to action to help stop some new outrage. It’s important to help wherever you can, but it’s also important that we follow through on earlier efforts to make positive change and head toward greater stewardship and justice in our communities. We’re asking supporters of clean energy to help us complete a critical step in our community’s shared commitment to protect the climate and stop new fossil fuel infrastructure from being built in our county.

Three years ago, in the early summer of 2014, we began to hear about a proposed new gas pipeline to run through West Dryden to provide heating fuel for new development in Lansing. The large capacity of the pipe would mean that Tompkins County would be unable to meet its goal of 80 percent reduction in CO2 emissions by 2050.

Read more…

CCE Tompkins’ Green Buildings Open House Sure to Inspire

Tompkins Weekly         9-11-17

By Guillermo Metz

It’s back! After taking a couple of years off to focus on other work, Cornell Cooperative Extension of Tompkins County is bringing back the Green Buildings Open House. For one day, Saturday, September 30, you can visit homes throughout Tompkins County that feature the latest and time-honored green building methods, materials and technologies.

The one-day format represents a departure, returning to the early years of the tour, which has been running locally for more than 15 years. During that time, many green building features that would have been really exceptional have become mainstream, like solar and above-code energy-efficient construction. That’s great news for our community!

Read more…




ST Blog

Older Posts

How to Get Active on Climate? Even More Locally
Fracking: What Are We FOR?
Sustainability is a Society of Systems Thinkers

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Help ST Finish What We Started on Dryden Pipeline

Everyday you are probably getting 2 or 3 calls to action to help stop some new outrage. It’s important to help wherever you can, but it’s also important that our movement follow through on earlier efforts to make positive change and head toward greater stewardship and justice in our communities. We’re asking our supporters to take a minute today and help us complete a critical step in our community’s shared commitment to protect the climate and stop new fossil fuel infrastructure from being built in our county.

Three years ago, in the early summer of 2014, we began to hear about a proposed new gas pipeline to run through West Dryden to provide heating fuel for new development in Lansing. The large capacity of the pipe would mean that Tompkins County would be unable to meet its goal of 80% reduction in CO2 emissions by 2050.

ST helped organize local opposition to the project and teamed up to present several workshops on viable alternatives to the pipeline to meet Lansing’s energy needs. A countywide task force on energy and economic development eventually came to the same conclusions and recommended to the Public Service Commission (PSC) that NYSEG address reliability concerns for existing Lansing gas customers by adding pressure boosters to the current pipeline. In addition, NYSEG would provide incentives to developers to build new structures in Lansing using smart design and ultra-efficient heat pumps to meet commercial and residential heating loads. (Many industrial processes can be powered with electricity rather than gas as well.) Read more…

 
Energy and Equity Go Hand in Hand

WHY WE NEED TO JOIN EFFORTS TO PROTECT THE ENVIRONMENT WITH EFFORTS TO ELIMINATE POVERTY AND RACISM

Extreme income inequality, persistent racism, and increasing climate disruption are undeniable plagues of our time. We are fortunate that many people in Tompkins County are working on these issues. Some are advocates for racial and economic justice, such as creating living-wage jobs, removing barriers to reentry from the prison system, and ensuring affordable housing for all. Many others are involved in initiatives to reduce carbon emissions, such as, stopping gas infrastructure development, switching from fossil fuels to renewable sources, and conserving energy in housing, transportation, food, water, and waste. Read more…

 
Home Rule and the Greater Good

After hours of discussion at the June 16th county legislative meeting, the vote on the fate of the Old Library ended in a stalemate of 6 in favor of a large apartment complex for seniors (TravisHyde), and 6 in favor of a smaller adaptive reuse condo project (Franklin Properties) which had hundreds of petition supporters and inspired dozens of citizens to show up and speak in favor of the Franklin proposal. Read more…

 
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